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Similarly, the fact that several commentaries on the Aryabhatiya have come from Kerala has been used to suggest that it was Aryabhata's main place of life and activity; however, many commentaries have come from outside Kerala, and the Aryasiddhanta was completely unknown in Kerala.

A verse mentions that Aryabhata was the head of an institution (kulapa) at Kusumapura, and, because the university of Nalanda was in Pataliputra at the time and had an astronomical observatory, it is speculated that Aryabhata might have been the head of the Nalanda university as well.

The extreme brevity of the text was elaborated in commentaries by his disciple Bhaskara I (Bhashya, c.

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It also contained a description of several astronomical instruments: the gnomon (shanku-yantra), a shadow instrument (chh Ay A-yantra), possibly angle-measuring devices, semicircular and circular (dhanur-yantra / chakra-yantra), a cylindrical stick yasti-yantra, an umbrella-shaped device called the chhatra-yantra, and water clocks of at least two types, bow-shaped and cylindrical.

A third text, which may have survived in the Arabic translation, is Al ntf or Al-nanf.

The Arya-siddhanta, a lost work on astronomical computations, is known through the writings of Aryabhata's contemporary, Varahamihira, and later mathematicians and commentators, including Brahmagupta and Bhaskara I.

This work appears to be based on the older Surya Siddhanta and uses the midnight-day reckoning, as opposed to sunrise in Aryabhatiya.

It is also occasionally referred to as Arya-shatas-a Sh Ta (literally, Aryabhata's 108), because there are 108 verses in the text.

It is written in the very terse style typical of sutra literature, in which each line is an aid to memory for a complex system.

Later writers substituted it with jaib, meaning "pocket" or "fold (in a garment)".

(In Arabic, jiba is a meaningless word.) Later in the 12th century, when Gherardo of Cremona translated these writings from Arabic into Latin, he replaced the Arabic jaib with its Latin counterpart, sinus, which means "cove" or "bay"; thence comes the English word sine.

However, Aryabhata did not use the Brahmi numerals.

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