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The drug use must be "implicated" in the emergency department visit, but does not need to be the direct cause of the visit.Most of the illicit drug emergency room visits involved multiple drugs.According to the United States Department of Health and Human Services, there were 455,000 emergency room visits associated with cannabis use in 2011.

In a separate statement, a spokesperson for the National Geographic, said: “The National Geographic Society has complied with all applicable laws and acted appropriately with respect to its relationship with Dr Zahi Hawass and the government of Egypt.” Dr Hawass was likewise indignant. “I’m the most famous Egyptologist.” Dr Hawass, who lost his perch as protector of his country’s ancient treasures after the first Egyptian uprising and fall of Mubarak, signed successive deals with National Geographic that named him an “explorer-in-residence”.

The deal gradually made him a celebrity with armchair archaeology fans in America and wherever National Geographic TV is shown.

Cannabis was ranked 11th in dependence, 17th in physical harm, and 10th in social harm.

Acute effects may include anxiety and panic, impaired attention, and memory (while intoxicated), an increased risk of psychotic symptoms, and possibly an increased risk of accidents if a person drives a motor vehicle while intoxicated.

For a decade, Dr Hawass seemingly played a critical role in giving National Geographic constant access to the antiquities, including the pyramids and Tutankhamun treasures which because of their popularity with the public became a lynchpin of its expansion.

Fees for those services, which according to the Vocativ news web site ranged from ,000 (£50,000) to 0,000 a year, could be interpreted under US law as illegal bribes.

National Geographic may be facing an unexpected challenge to its reputation as one of the world’s most respected educational and scientific institutions amid reports that it is under investigation in the United States over its ties to a former Egyptian official who for years held the keys to his country’s many popular antiquities.

At issue is whether the Washington-based organisation, which in recent years has rapidly extended its public reach beyond its well-known glossy magazine to a cable television channel and other enterprises, violated strict US laws on payments to officials of foreign governments in contracts starting in 2001 with Dr Zahi Hawass, who, until the overthrow of President Hosni Mubarak, was the government’s sole gatekeeper to all things ancient Egypt.

The Justice Department declined to confirm the investigation.

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