Dating and relating book review

German Jewish father who'd been in concentration camp goes mad and tries to commit suicide.

Josef the Berlin Jewish boy gets beat up, as does Cuban Isabel's father. It paints a vivid picture of the plight of refugees, and the kids and families seem both real and relatable, making this a good book for sparking family discussion.

by Alan Gratz is a historical novel that braids the stories of three young refugees in three different time periods and settings: 1938 Berlin, 1994 Cuba, and 2015 Syria.

The circumstances of all the kids and families are dire, and their journeys are fraught with imminent danger.

Josef the Berlin Jewish boy gets beat up, as does Cuban Isabel's father. It paints a vivid picture of the plight of refugees, and the kids and families seem both real and relatable, making this a good book for sparking family discussion.

Syrian Mahmoud's home is destroyed by a missile, and he sees a dead man floating in the sea, as well as a soldier with a bullet in his head. " /, which carried fleeing German Jews and was denied entry by Cuba and the United States and had to turn back to Europe.

Usually, it’s an article or study that I share on Thursdays.

But I rarely read books about dating; it’s too much like my day job.

For even though Birger is presumably correct on the statistics, it does not mean the story is over and that women should give up. First, there is something a bit elitist in only giving numbers on college-educated women who want college-educated men. There are a LOT of women who have opted out of the marriage sweepstakes, in other words.

People with Bachelors degrees only account for only 40% of the population. I understand why educated people want to date educated people, but let’s not pretend that everyone who didn’t go to college is a drooling moron. Many women are depressed or in a bad emotional state. Now, we don’t know if there are an equal number of men who have opted out, but I think it’s safe to say the musical chairs metaphor doesn’t quite hold water.

The publisher recommends this book for kids starting at age 9, but due to the level of violence and peril, we recommend it for 10 and up.

Though all three protagonists survive for the length of the story, all lose family members.

The Syrian story is also based on news accounts of specific refugees.

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